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10 Comments

  1. I can attest of the validity of the pratice of Vipassana Meditation as a healing process
    to help find the healing of relapse of depression.
    1st episode: nov 1993
    2 relapse : summer 1999
    3 relapse : spring 2005
    Start in jan. 2006 MBSR
    so in 2006 12 weeks MBSR x 3 + 4 Days Intensive Daylong Vipassana
    2007 12 weeks MBSR x 3 + 7 Days Intensive Daylong Vipassana
    2008 12 weeks MBSR x 3 + 4 Days Intensive Daylong Vipassana
    2009 12 weeks MBSR x 3 + 4 Days Intensive Daylong Vipassana
    2010 12 weeks MBSR x 3 + 4 Days Intensive Daylong Vipassana
    2011 12 weeks MBSR x 3 +2 Days 7 hours Daylong Vipassana
    2012 12 weeks MBSR x 3 +2 Days 7 hours Daylong Vipassana
    So I will terminate in december 2012, 84 weeks of practice of Vipassana meditation
    after succeeding having a daily practice starting in november 2006.
    So, no relapse since starting MBSR & MBCT under the guidance of PhD-Psy with over 35
    experience.
    Life is beautiful
    Just keep practicing.
    Have a very good day !
    Have a g

  2. Thank you very much, very helpful.

  3. I love the information presented on this website but find it so frustrating that my organization (State Governement) blocks utube videos so i can’t get the information at work to share with clients.

  4. I am a firm believer in mindfulness and how it can help prevent relapses into depression. The challenge is getting people to utilize mindfulness strategies and tools when they are already depressed. I work on this regularly with my depressed clients, and those who are willing to take that leap of faith and embrace mindfulness as a means to feeling better do remarkably better than those who are resistant to it.

  5. I cannot believe the timeliness of this program for me. I just returned home from a Physciatric facility after attempting suicide.

  6. I’m convinced of the value of mindfulness (disclosure: meditating since 1976). I was thrilled to learn Segal, and colleagues Williams and Teasdale, had contacted Kabt-Zinn about Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and utilized that consultation in the development of Segal et al.’s (2002) Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). The evidence is pretty solid that MBCT can cut the incidence of relapse roughly in half. The proposal that MBCT is a depression treatment per se is also very encouraging. Thanks, Ruth, for giving this heads-up to a larger audience.

  7. It is true that people are fearful of experiencing depression and many other mental health issues such as panic and anxiety. I have found mind- body approaches to be helpful. Talking with people about what is “normal and expected” seems to help — it is expected to experience depression following a loss. I often challenge the global thinking that comes with depression both in discussions and in trance work. I am looking forward to the next webinar and learning about the current research.