How to Help a Client Come Back into Their Window of Tolerance

The window of tolerance is such an important concept when we’re working with trauma and dysregulation. For clients who have experienced trauma, that window often becomes quite narrow. They may space out and dissociate, or get too angry or anxious to focus. Or, they might fluctuate between hyper- and hypo-arousal. When they’re too far outside…

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How to Rebuild Secure Attachment After Trauma

When a person experiences trauma, there’s one key factor that can play an important role in whether or not PTSD symptoms develop – and that’s secure attachment. But what happens when someone has never had a connection to a secure attachment figure?? How can we help our client build the feelings of safety that are…

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How Does Trauma Affect a Person’s Interaction with Their Child?

Trauma can change the brain . . . . . . but the person who experienced the trauma may not be the only one whose brain changes. In the video below, Ruth Lanius, MD, PhD describes what we’re discovering about the connections between a parent’s trauma and their child’s developing brain. Take a look –…

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Expanding on Epigenetics: A Deeper Look at What Affects Our Genes

Can we influence our genes? If you joined us for this week’s webinar on epigenetics with Bruce Lipton, PhD, you might have a new perspective on how your experiences, brain, and biology all relate to gene expression. Now, this week’s focus on epigenetics related to brain science, but we have also covered it in our…

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How PTSD changes children’s brains

Trauma can change the brain . . . . . . but it doesn’t just change the survivor’s brain. In fact, it can actually change the brains of the survivor’s children – in some pretty insidious ways. Ruth Lanius, MD, PhD explains how traumatic experiences can affect a mother’s children, even if the children themselves…

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How Trauma Affects a Child’s Brain

We all know that trauma impacts us emotionally, but does it also affect our intelligence? A new study published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health suggests that children who witness their mothers being the victim of abuse, or experience physical or sexual abuse themselves, actually score lower on cognitive tests later in life….

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