How a Mindfulness-Based Kindness Curriculum Could Shape the Future

Many of our adult clients struggle with the ability to control their thoughts and impulses. These weak self-regulation skills can damage relationships, decrease success at work, and lead to addictive behaviors. What if we could have intervened early on in their lives, even as early as grade school? What kind of changes would that have made in our client’s futures? Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently ran a study to determine the impact of a mindfulness-based Kindness Curriculum (KC) on executive function, self-regulation, and prosocial behavior in preschool students. Researchers randomly assigned children to one of two conditions: either…

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Skills for Helping Clients Get “Unstuck” During Times of Uncertainty

Times of uncertainty often become powerful opportunities for growth. And yet, fear of uncertainty can freeze people in their tracks – unable to make a decision or take a step. So when clients get stuck, how can we help them move forward? In the video below Joan Borysenko, PhD describes specific skills that can help people become “unstuck” during periods of transition. Take a look – it’s about 5 minutes. This video was taken from the Next Level Practitioner training program where members receive a daily video like this from one of the top 25 experts in our field. That…

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5 Ways to Create an Anti-Depressant Brain

Depression can rob people of their sense of aliveness and vitality, interfere with job performance, disrupt relationships, and increase the likelihood of self-harm. So are there tools we can use to help clients reduce and even prevent suffering from depression? My friend, Elisha Goldstein, PhD has identified 5 natural ways to create an anti-depressant brain. Elisha is a clinical psychologist in private practice, co-founder of The Center for Mindful Living in LA, and author of the book Uncovering Happiness: Overcoming Depression with Mindfulness and Self-Compassion. ________________________________________________________ For years now, I’ve studied what helps create more resilience and happiness within us….

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A Better Night’s Sleep with Mindfulness?

One of the problems with antidepressants is their side effects, such as fatigue, anxiety, loss of libido, and sleep disturbance. Dr. Willoughby Britton and her research team at the University of Arizona wanted to find out whether mindfulness could help with sleep disturbance – one of the most common side effects of antidepressants. Researchers randomly assigned 23 participants, all of whom were taking antidepressant medications, to one of two interventions. Some received a mindfulness-based cognitive therapy course while others were placed on a waitlist to serve as a control. Throughout the 9-week study, subjects in both groups completed sleep diaries,…

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Can Mindfulness Change How the Brain Processes Emotion?

We’d like to think it can, but what does the evidence show? A working definition of mindfulness is that it attentively and non-judgmentally focuses on present experiences. But does this actually affect anything in the brain? To find out, Jacqueline Lutz, from the psychiatry department at the University Hospital of Zurich, led a study investigating whether mindfulness could affect the brain during emotional arousal. Lutz and her colleagues recruited 49 subjects with no prior or existing neurological or psychiatric illnesses and randomly assigned them to either the mindfulness group or the control group, which received no mindfulness instruction. Researchers hypothesized…

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Self-Compassion: The Secret to Reducing PTSD Symptoms?

One thing that can frequently increase the suffering of many patients with PTSD is shame. Even worse, shame can limit a patient’s treatment – even if they objectively know that there’s nothing to be ashamed of. But is there a way to trade self-judgment for self-compassion? And would that reduce a client’s symptoms? Asle Hoffart, PhD, adjunct professor of psychology at the University of Oslo, wanted to study how self-compassion impacted symptoms of PTSD. Hoffart measured self-compassion with his six-part Self-Compassion Scale. First, he designated three components that made up self compassion: self-kindness (being kind to oneself even during hard…

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