60 Minutes of Mindfulness – How Anderson Cooper’s Meditation Experience Changed His Life (and His Brain)

It’s always exciting to me when I witness more and more people from all walks of life begin to see the value of mindfulness training. And just recently, Anderson Cooper and the folks at CBS just put out a 60 Minutes episode on that very topic. This really underscores just how mainstream mindfulness has become. In fact, I often see this when I attend business meetings – many people will approach me, asking me to show them how to meditate (even though I’m not a meditation teacher). So in case you haven’t come across the video yet, I thought I’d…

Read More »


Brain Change and Mindfulness . . . In 8 Weeks?

Could someone who has never before been exposed to mindfulness begin to see results in as little as 8 weeks? Eight weeks isn’t all that long. But it could be just enough to cause significant change in someone’s brain (and therefore in their life). A group of researchers out of the University of Siena, in Italy, led by Emiliano Santarnecchi, PhD, set out to answer that question. They also wanted to find out if there might be a correlation between physical changes in the brain and how folks fared psychologically. The team randomized 48 right-handed participants who had never meditated…

Read More »


Depression, Anxiety, Stress . . . Could Mindfulness Group Therapy Help?

It can be really exciting to come across research offering insight into new techniques . . . . . . particularly when the method allows us to reach more people than we usually can. A team of researchers out of the Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Sweden, led by Jan Sundquist, MD, PhD, wanted to compare the outcome of mindfulness-based group therapy against that of individual-based cognitive therapy (CBT). They conducted an 8-week randomized controlled trial that included 215 patients (between the ages of 20-64) who exhibited symptoms of depression, anxiety, or stress. Participants were randomly assigned…

Read More »


A Global Audience in Rethinking Trauma

As this year’s Rethinking Trauma webinar series comes to a close, I’d like to take a moment to thank you for tuning in. Every time we run a series, I’m humbled by the number of people who take part. In this series, 19,566 practitioners joined us for one or more of the webinars. I’m thrilled to see so many folks coming together here from around the world, so I wanted to give you a quick report for a glimpse of the community you’ve been a part of – a global network from 83 countries: United States 13,729 Czech Republic 5…

Read More »


Coping with Childhood Trauma: A Strategy for Overcoming Increased Risk for HIV

Why is it that 33% to 53% of HIV-infected people have histories of childhood sexual abuse? Many symptoms commonly found among survivors of childhood sexual abuse, such as helplessness, low self-esteem, dissociation, denial, and self-destructiveness are also often seen in conjunction with HIV risk behavior. Studies show that childhood sexual abuse is associated with avoidant coping, which can lead to increased traumatic symptoms. So perhaps changing the coping strategy of people who experienced childhood sexual abuse could be useful? Duke University professor Kathleen J. Sikkema, PhD conducted a study to examine whether a coping intervention could reduce traumatic stress and…

Read More »


Working with Memory to Reframe a Traumatic Experience

A single moment can last forever in our memory . . . Now when it’s something special, a time or an event that we hold dear, reliving memories can feel almost as good to us as the actual moment did. But when someone’s memory keeps replaying a traumatic experience, that can cause them to relive difficult feelings of pain, fear, or helplessness over and over again . . . . . . and this, in turn, can slow the healing process for patients recovering from trauma. So can traumatic memories be changed? In the video below, Peter Levine, PhD shares…

Read More »