The Body’s Adaptive Response to Trauma

The pain from trauma runs deep, and its impact lingers in both the brain and body. And so often, people who have experienced trauma are embarrassed by their body’s response to the event – the way it shut down on them when they needed protection most. But in the video below, Stephen Porges, PhD explains why that “shut down” may have been the most protective thing their body could have done. Take a look – it’s about 3 minutes. This video was taken from the Next Level Practitioner training program where members receive a daily video like this from one…

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How to Get to the Heart of Resistance

The moment a client begins to resist, progress often comes to a crashing halt. But with the right strategies and a little creativity, we can usually get people back on course. For instance, when Marsha Linehan, PhD encounters resistance, she often starts to chip away at it by asking one key question. In the video below, Marsha will share a few simple strategies that can keep clients moving forward. She’ll also share one key question that gets at the heart of resistance. Take a look – it’s just about 4 minutes. This video was taken from the Next Level Practitioner…

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The Impact of Trauma on Future Generations

Could trauma’s impact be passed along genetically from one generation to the next? For years, Rachel Yehuda, PhD has been studying the biological impact of trauma on Holocaust survivors and their children. We discussed some of her earlier findings here. At that time, researchers were in the early stages of investigating epigenetic change – the possibility that changes in gene expression, specifically those related to trauma, could be passed along to future generations. In a groundbreaking study published in September, 2016 in Biological Psychiatry, Yehuda and her colleagues looked into whether trauma-related changes in gene expression could be passed along…

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The Surprising Connection between Posture and Resilience

When patients can’t find words to describe their experience, we can often find clues . . . . . . in their posture, in the ways they move, and even in the limitations to their movement. According to Pat Ogden, PhD, when a client has a greater range of movement options – or “movement vocabulary” – they’ll have more options for responding to life’s stresses. And that can increase their resilience. In the video below, Pat describes how she helped a client who had suffered years of abuse begin to expand her movement vocabulary. Take a look – it’s about…

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How Drama and Theater Can Rewire Limiting Beliefs

As practitioners, we sometimes have to be creative in coming up with interventions that will work for a particular patient. And this can be especially true when clients have deeply rooted limiting beliefs about themselves. Bessel van der Kolk, MD is a master at coming up with creative approaches to help clients work with beliefs and emotions that hold them back. In the video below, Bessel shares a story about how, and why, theater can be a powerful tool in working with patients. Take a look – it’s just under 5 minutes. This video was taken from the Next Level…

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Guilt vs. Shame

What are the differences between guilt and shame? And how could it help our clients to have a better understanding of those differences? We thought it could be useful for you to have a side-by-side comparison of these powerful emotions that you could share with your clients. Because understanding these differences could help our clients begin to dismantle their negative self-judgments. So we created this infographic. (Please feel free to make a copy to give to your clients.) Click the image to enlarge If you’d like to print a copy to share with your clients, just click here: Color or…

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