The Body’s Adaptive Response to Trauma

The pain from trauma runs deep, and its impact lingers in both the brain and body. And so often, people who have experienced trauma are embarrassed by their body’s response to the event – the way it shut down on them when they needed protection most. But in the video below, Stephen Porges, PhD explains why that “shut down” may have been the most protective thing their body could have done. Take a look – it’s about 3 minutes. This video was taken from the Next Level Practitioner training program where members receive a daily video like this from one…

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The Surprising Connection between Posture and Resilience

When patients can’t find words to describe their experience, we can often find clues . . . . . . in their posture, in the ways they move, and even in the limitations to their movement. According to Pat Ogden, PhD, when a client has a greater range of movement options – or “movement vocabulary” – they’ll have more options for responding to life’s stresses. And that can increase their resilience. In the video below, Pat describes how she helped a client who had suffered years of abuse begin to expand her movement vocabulary. Take a look – it’s about…

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How a Mindfulness-Based Kindness Curriculum Could Shape the Future

Many of our adult clients struggle with the ability to control their thoughts and impulses. These weak self-regulation skills can damage relationships, decrease success at work, and lead to addictive behaviors. What if we could have intervened early on in their lives, even as early as grade school? What kind of changes would that have made in our client’s futures? Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently ran a study to determine the impact of a mindfulness-based Kindness Curriculum (KC) on executive function, self-regulation, and prosocial behavior in preschool students. Researchers randomly assigned children to one of two conditions: either…

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A Simple Mindfulness Practice to Restore Vitality

When clients lose their sense of aliveness and vitality, how can we help them reclaim it? According to Dr. Tara Brach, we can begin by helping them notice the tension in their bodies. In the video below, Tara shares a personal story of how this helped her reclaim her own sense of aliveness. She also shares a simple practice that you can try right away. Take a look – it’s about 6 ½ minutes. This video was taken from the Next Level Practitioner training program where members receive a daily video like this from one of the top 25 experts…

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How Drama and Theater Can Rewire Limiting Beliefs

As practitioners, we sometimes have to be creative in coming up with interventions that will work for a particular patient. And this can be especially true when clients have deeply rooted limiting beliefs about themselves. Bessel van der Kolk, MD is a master at coming up with creative approaches to help clients work with beliefs and emotions that hold them back. In the video below, Bessel shares a story about how, and why, theater can be a powerful tool in working with patients. Take a look – it’s just under 5 minutes. This video was taken from the Next Level…

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Why Mind-Wandering Can Be a Detriment to Happiness (and One Way to Refocus)

When a person’s thoughts start to stray, they can tend to go in one of two directions. Sometimes people find themselves dreaming of an upcoming vacation or looking forward to a get-together with friends . . . . . . or, maybe they’re distracted by worries about approaching deadlines or unpaid bills. Even though the former scenario seems preferable to the latter, both instances of mind-wandering could be detrimental to happiness. Why? Dan Siegel, MD reveals his answer in the video below, and shares one way to refocus. How have you used mindfulness practices in your work with clients? Please…

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